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8–9 cc. BC. The gold sewn plate, quadrangular, lay in the eastern part of the burial chamber, closer to the northeast corner of the pit. The assumption that the plate is lost by robbers is confirmed by the conditions of its finding, in solitary form, in the eastern part of the burial, between the two bones of the lower leg. Since the plate contains four round holes for fastening, located at the corners, it is obvious that they were intended for sewing. The plate is a rectangular ribbed frame. The edges of the frame are decorated with longitudinal protuberances, which are squeezed from the inside. The total number of ribbed protuberances is 38 and if you take into account that the angular protuberances have holes, then on the upper longitudinal frame the number of ribs is 7, and on the lower longitudinal strip there are six larger bulges. The number of convex ribs on the right side bar is 11, and they are 10 on the left bar. In the center of the described frame there is a bird, in a heraldic pose, with its wings raised. The upper part of the bird's head is broken, but its contour and part of the beak, shown in full-face, are well preserved. 

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Ring
8–9 cc. BC. Similar ritual-memorial fences of Zhaysan Complex 10 have been investigated on the territory of Tuva, Mongolia and Central Kazakhstan. Despite the fact that the shape and location of the fences are similar, balbals are located on their eastern part. The monument Datings back to the 6th-8th cc. The ring discovered in Zhaysan Complex 10 is with a round flap and without ornaments. It indicates the high social status of the buried. 
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Plate with Floral Ornament
3–2 cc. BC. On other plaques from Tengilik barrow, carved from foil or beaten off the matrix and having a hole for coming, the plant motifs predominate: trefoils, rosettes, lotus buds, shoots. Especially interesting is the motif ‘curly vines with flowers,’ which finds exact analogies among the ornamental motifs of Hellenistic art: Greco-Bactrian, Indo-Greek, Parthian. Ornamentation of most things has parallels, first of all, in the monuments of Altai barrows like Berel, Shchibe, Kotandy, according to the latest information, synchronous to Pazyryk, and Hellenistic art of Central Asia. Some products come close to the Issyk ones, especially painted with red and black colors. 

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Plate with Rider’s Image

3–2 cc. BC. The most interesting find in Tänlik is a series of trapeziform plaques adorning, most likely, clothes with the image of a rider. Suit on the rider is Saki’s: soft helmet; there is a cloak. The horse is hogmaned with a sultan and its legs are bent. The horse has a decoration. The origins of the rider's image are not clear. Similar images are known in the Middle East and Asia Minor from the end of II millennium BC. 

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Silver Jug
7–8 cc. The silver jug ​​stood the test of time well, although one side of it is strongly deformed. The handle in the form of a circle with a diameter of 1.5 cm is made separately and connected to the jug by rivets. One of them is made in the form of a heart. Similar in form silver jugs were found in Pereshchepin burial ground and in the valley of KoshkarTokmak area in Kyrgyzstan. 
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Plaques with Node of Longevity Motif
13–14 cc. Two gold large openwork waistbands in the form of mystical evil with oval braces for suspension. The plates are moulded from the matrix and engraved. Inside they are hollow, soldered from two halves, which creates the illusion of massiveness. On the reverse side there are two loops for fastening. 
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Bowl with Floral Ornament
13–14 cc. Electric (gold and silver alloy) bowl with a figured horizontal handle with the engraved ornament (lotus flowers, curling vines, clouds). The electric vessel, apparently, is made on a wooden matrix. There are mints, scratches, dirt and blackening. 

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Earrings with Pendants
4–1 cc. BC. Two gold earrings with carnelian, curved in a ring with wire to which flat brackets are soldered for hanging a stone ornament of red color. Between a trapezoidal stone with drilled holes and soldered staples, where there are wires twisted together. 
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Earrings with Pendant
6–5 cc. BC. Earrings made of gold with the use of high technology for their time and art tricks, which have a rod between the ring and pendants. The earring has a spherical suspension. 

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Golden Jug
4–3 cc. BC. The brightest find in the complex is a small pitcher 5.3 cm high, weighing 17.9 grams, made of a thin gold plate. Judging by the data of Chinese and Mongolian sources, it is known that similar jars of gold and silver were widely used among the Turks.

The peculiarity of the jug from Shyngystau is that its height is greater than the width, the walls are convex in the middle, and not in the lower part, that is, the contours make it look like a vase. The handle is not made of twisted wire, but of a plate. 

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Buckle
6–5 cc. BC. Buckle with the image of four figures of predators. One was used as an ornament for the horse's headband, the rest served as a decoration for clothes. All predators (apparently, tigers) are depicted standing in quiet poses, with a turn of the head to the right. 
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Earring with Pendant
6–5 cc. BC. Earrings made of gold with the use of high technology for their time and art tricks, which have a rod between the ring and pendants. The earring has a spherical suspension. 
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Iron Acenaces
6–5 cc. BC. Iron acenaces with bar-shaped pommel and butterfly-shaped reticle. The handle and hilt of this ceremonial dagger are covered with sheet gold, and two gold congregational pendents adorn the sword knot. 
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Earrings

12–10 cc. BC. One of them is gold-filled; it does not differ from Andronov ring-shaped, and the other, cast in a special form, has a bushing-socket type fastening. Inside the ring are two figures of standing horses. The images are schematic and stylized: hypertrophied neck with mane, divided into strands, a long muzzle, somewhat curved down, and round eyes. The images were obviously carved and drilled in a soft stone mold for casting the product and subsequently subjected to forging. Figures of horses are two-sided reliefs. 

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Swastika Shaped Plaques (small)

6–5 cc. BC. Plaques of the subquadrat form, swastika-like with an ornithomorphic image bearing an emphatically predatory character. Four heads of griffins are depicted in profile and placed one behind the other in a circle, closing the composition in a circular rotation, around the convex circle in the center and worked out by a roller framing it. Beaks of griffins touch the occipital part of the anterior griffins. The clear aggressiveness of the image of the griffin might be seen. The griffin motif is represented in the form of a bird's head with a powerful closed long and blunt beak bent to the bottom with a distinguished wax, with a large round convex eye framed by a rounded platen. The line of the mouth is in the form of a deepened arcuate groove. The relief is clear, well developed from the front and back. On the reverse side, 4 loops are soldered. The holes of the four griffins are punched under the beaks. Under the eyes of the griffins to the back of the neck, a groove is developed in the form of a comma, edged with a platen. 

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Nasal Plaques in Form of Swastika (large)

6–5 cc. BC. Plaques of subquadrat form, swastika-like with ornithomorphic image bearing an emphatically predatory character. Four heads of griffins are depicted in profile and placed one behind the other in a circle, closing the composition in a circular rotation, around the convex circle in the middle and worked out by a roller framing it. Beaks of griffins touch the occipital part of the anterior griffins. The pronounced aggressiveness of the image of the griffin is seen. The griffin motif is represented in the form of a bird's head with a powerful closed long and blunt beak bent to the bottom with a distinguished wax, with a large round convex eye framed by a rounded platen. The line of the mouth is indicated in the form of a deepened arcuate groove. The relief is clear, well developed from the front and back. On the reverse side, 4 loops are soldered. The holes of the four griffins are punched under the beaks. Under the eyes of the griffins to the back of the neck, a groove is developed in the form of a comma, edged with a platen. 

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Uniform Plaques with the Image of Two Opposing Heads of Griffin-Rams
6–5 cc. BC. Uniform plaques with the image of two opposing heads of griffin-rams, closed in an oval. Heads of griffin sheep are in high relief. In the plot of the composition, you can see large heads with an extended muzzle, depicted in a fight. The mouths are closed. Eyes with a round convex pupil, bordered by a rim of a drop-shaped form. Ears are short petal-shaped, horizontal. The horns of animals are decorated with rollers and are bent around the ear, the edge of the ear rests against the horns. Beak is curved. The line of the mouth is indicated in the form of a deep groove, edged with a platen. The relief is clear, well developed from the front and back. Plaques are made of wrought gold leaf embossed from the front side of the matrix. On the back of each plate are soldered four loops. 

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Protoma of Winged Horses with Horns of a Mountain Goat

4–3 cc. BC. Expressive lines outline the mouth, nostrils, eyes and brow ridges,the cheekbones are convexly contoured. The head is crowned by large goat horns, and they also have wings. The legs are tucked. The horses' ptotoma are made in the technique of circular sculpture. The basis of the sculpture is a tree, a plate of gold leaf.

Horsewas considered one of the mythological sacred animals of Saki tribes. The horns of wild sheep on horses emphasized the divine essence and the chosenness of their earthly lord. The horse was considered a guide to another world, and the wings personified the upper world. 

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